Where are the “most at risk” sites in Columbus, Ohio?

COLUMBUS, Ohio (WCMH) – From the former site of the Ohio State School for the Blind to a plantation-style hilltop property that once housed an HIV/AIDS hospice, Columbus Landmarks has released its list of nine “most endangered” sites in the city.

Columbus Landmarks, a group dedicated to preserving the city’s historic landmarks, has announced its ninth annual selection of Columbus properties most at risk of demolition or dereliction, according to council chairman Peter Krajnak.

Krajnak, who is also principal of Columbus-based Rogers Krajnak Architects, said to make the cut, properties must be historic — built at least 50 years ago — and contribute, in some way. , the value and the culture of the city.

“What was the role of the building within the community? Does the building have a story to tell about who lived there, who worked there, who studied there? ” he said.

Sites in five neighborhoods that have historically faced divestment — Hilltop, Linden, Milo-Grogan, King-Lincoln Bronzeville and South Side — are prioritized on Columbus Landmarks’ annual list, Krajnak said. Of the 70 most endangered sites presented by Columbus Landmarks over the years, Krajnak said 27 have been saved, eight demolished and 35 are awaiting redevelopment.

The group’s ultimate goal, Krajnak said, is to raise awareness of Columbus’ rich history, educate people about their neighborhoods, and advocate for the preservation and future use of the city’s “treasures.”

“Some people talk about building sustainability, and keeping a building in place and fit for future use is one of the most sustainable things we can do instead of a building ending up in a landfill,” said said Krajnak, Rogers’ lead architect. Krajnak Architects, said. “The building could have a new life and live on – it helps our community become a better community.”

South Dormitory at Columbus Public Health

Photo taken March 19, 2021. Courtesy of Franklin County Auditor’s Office

Address: 240 Parson Ave.

Piece: Old Town East

Construction date : 1935

Owner: City of Columbus

Why he made the list: The city has proposed demolishing the building, part of the 1874 Old Ohio State School for the Blind, to build a drive-through activity space and surface parking lot in 2021, Columbus Landmarks said. The Columbus City Council, however, denied funding for the demolition.

Farm Crest Bakeries Building

Photo taken May 7, 2021. Courtesy of Franklin County Auditor’s Office

Address: 1826 E. Livingston Ave.

Piece: driving park

Construction date : 1950

Owner: Management Lee-Elle

Why he made the list: Affordable housing developer Woda Cooper has proposed in 2022 to demolish the building and replace it with two four-story buildings with 124 apartments and retail stores on the first floor, according to Columbus Landmarks. The site once housed the cookie division of Detroit-based Farm Crest Bakeries.

Sprague House

Photo taken June 12, 2021. Courtesy of Franklin County Auditor’s Office

Address: 5961 E. Livingston Ave.

Piece: Far East

Construction date : around 1825

Owner: Velta D banks.

Why he made the list: The nearly 200-year-old property – awarded by former President James Madison to a Canadian refugee during the American Revolution – is vacant and deteriorated.

E. 17th Ave. Garden Apartments

Photo taken May 13, 2021. Courtesy of Franklin County Auditor’s Office

Address: 1294 E. 17th Ave. and 1265-71 E. 17th Ave.

Piece: Southern Basswood

Construction date : 1925

Owner: New Life Management Company and Infinity Financial Services LLC

Why he made the list: The now vacant and deteriorated multi-unit residential property could be an opportunity to address Columbus’ growing housing shortage, according to Columbus Landmarks.

Eldon Smith House

Photo taken April 18, 2021. Courtesy of Franklin County Auditor’s Office

Address: 2456 Broad Street West.

Piece: Hill

Construction date : around 1900

Owner: Degas Real Estate Solutions LLC

Why he made the list: The southern plantation-style property once housed a hospice and support center for HIV/AIDS patients. A recent proposal for the site to become a drug rehabilitation center is stalling, Columbus Landmarks said, and the building’s future remains unknown.

St. Stephen’s Original Community House

Address: 379 E. Barthman Ave.

Piece: Hungarian village

Construction date : around 1910

Owner: Park Properties Investments LLC

Why he made the list: The former site of St. Stephen’s Community House served as a neighborhood center for Eastern European immigrants new to Columbus. Most of the property’s windows are boarded up and the building appears to be underutilized, Columbus Landmarks said.

A photo of the site at 379 E. Barthman Ave. was not available on the Franklin County Auditor’s website.

Ohio Avenue Church

Photo taken May 7, 2021. Courtesy of Franklin County Auditor’s Office

Address: 1013 S. Ohio Ave.

Piece: Southern Orchards

Construction date : 1911

Owner: Ohio Avenue Croissant LLC

Why he made the list: Previously home to Evangelical and Methodist worshippers, the former church was sold in 2021 and is now vacant and deteriorating.

Milo-Grogan commercial building

Photo taken March 14, 2021. Courtesy of Franklin County Auditor’s Office

Address: 876 Cleveland Ave.

Piece: Milo Grogan

Construction date : around 1910

Owner: Cleveland and 2nd LLC

Why he made the list: The two-story commercial building that once housed a jewelry repair shop and a Kroger is vacant and deteriorating.

main theater

Photo taken March 19, 2021. Courtesy of Franklin County Auditor’s Office

Address: 1336 Main Street E.

Piece: Franklin Park

Construction date : 1937

Owner: 1336 East Main Limited

Why he made the list: The deteriorating site of the old Franklin Park Cinema opened on Christmas Day in 1937.

To see the list of endangered species from Columbus Landmarks, click here.